Body Image in the LGBT+ Community: Carly's Perspective

"I always thought of myself as fat. And it used to be a given for me that "fat" had a negative connotation. As an adolescent I had a severely unhealthy view of my body-- no doubt contributed to by my mother's own negative body image and, you know, society in general. Looking at old pics, it's so weird to think of how much I hated my body; I may not have been "skinny," but I was by no means as large as I felt, and certainly not enough to warrant all diets I miserable-d my way through. I always judged myself harsher than I did others (don't we all?), and I never seemed to limit my concept of beauty to the "norm" where others were concerned, so why did I box myself in so much? Now, I am far, far larger than I ever was as a kid, but I feel so much more beautiful than I ever did before. I've started appreciating my body for what it can do and how it can feel and how soft and luscious I look to myself. Now when I take pictures I don't worry about whether you can see my double chin or if that angle doesn't flatter my arms; I've decided that as long as I look happy, it's a good pic. I am beautiful. And I am fat. The two are not mutually exclusive."

-Carly Maria Hubbard

Thank you so much to Carly for this incredibly relatable post, and for contributing to the countdown for Sculpt Yourself, which explores these themes regarding body positivity and what it means to different people.

Speaking of a countdown... this book comes out TOMORROW! I am so excited to share this novel with all of you! If you're an ebook reader, you can preorder the Kindle copy here, and it will download to your device tomorrow! If you prefer physical books, you can order starting tomorrow-- I'll keep you posted!

Happy November!
Love,
Savy

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